DELAHAYE Angélique

Angélique Delahaye

France
EPP, ENVI/AGRI Committees

Priorities:

  • Promote the role of local and regional authorities to contribute to the implementation of the EU Biodiversity Strategy 2020, including the EU Green Infrastructure Strategy, the No-net-loss initiative, the EU Climate Adaptation Strategy, the Regulation on Invasive alien species and Natura 2000
  • Follow up of the implementation of the Aichi Targets, EU Biodiversity Strategy and Natura 2000
  • Value natural capital and ecosystems services
  • Demonstrate the benefits of nature based solutions and green infrastructure to make economies and societies more resilient to modern challenges, including in urban areas

 

“What is the main goal you would like to achieve as Vice-Chair of the EP Intergroup on Climate Change, Biodiversity and Sustainable Development?”

As a professional farmer I have worked and still do to combine in the best way possible agriculture, environment and quality food with business competitiveness. I therefore wish as part of my duties as Vice-Chair of the Intergroup to share my experience on these issues. I believe that for such fundamentally important topics for the future of the European Union and its citizens we should be, in the framework of our work within the Intergroup, proactive and offer innovative ideas while remaining realistic and pragmatic. As Vice-Chair of the Intergroup I wish to widely promote the ideas that emerge from the work of this platform during this mandate, as I believe the Intergroup is an exceptional platform of reflexion from which great ideas come out.

“If you had to choose one specific issue that you think needs to be primarily tackled during this parliamentary term, what would it be? And why?”

I would particularly like to promote functional biodiversity, which has the objective of replacing the use of phytosanitary products by new techniques that are more environmentally-friendly, through the development of land plots colonised by predator insects that will regulate pest controlled cultures. Indeed, we note that phytosanitary products are not only cheaper but also potentially less harmful for the soils. We should therefore work towards finding alternative solutions and in this light it is extremely important to promote research and innovation in order to develop new techniques in this field. Nevertheless, it is crucial to remain realistic: farmers need solutions that are scientifically and economically viable if we want to get them on board. Farmers should always have the means of production.

Ricardo Serrão Santos

Ricardo Serrão Santos

Portugal
S&D, PECH/AGRI Committees

Priorities:

  • Promote the role of local and regional authorities to contribute to the implementation of the EU Biodiversity Strategy 2020, including the EU Green Infrastructure Strategy, the No-net-loss initiative, the EU Climate Adaptation Strategy, the Regulation on Invasive alien species and Natura 2000
  • Follow up of the implementation of the Aichi Targets, EU Biodiversity Strategy and Natura 2000
  • Value natural capital and ecosystems services
  • Demonstrate the benefits of nature based solutions and green infrastructure to make economies and societies more resilient to modern challenges, including in urban areas

 

“What is the main goal you would like to achieve as Vice-Chair of the EP Intergroup on Climate Change, Biodiversity and Sustainable Development?”

The overall strategy will be twofold. In the first year, I intend to target issues related with climate change under the scope of the upcoming COP21 in Paris. It is essential to promote a wide discussion on those topics in view to influence political decisions in support of reforms and decisions to reduce CO2 emissions. We have to go well beyond adaptation; we have to be pro-active in the mitigation of climate change vectors. There is no time to wait. Under this scope, I will try to bring into focus the relation between climate change and loss of marine biodiversity and ecosystem services. I will convey the importance of taking action in relation to the Arctic, namely through the designation of “Ecological and Biological Significant Areas” in this region, following recommendations of the EP in 2014.  For the remaining years, in addition to keeping this subject alive, I will bring up themes related with blue growth, conservation of marine biodiversity and ecosystem services, Lessepsian migration, deep-sea mining, marine litter and the loss of biodiversity, ocean literacy.

“If you had to choose one specific issue that you think needs to be primarily tackled during this parliamentary term, what would it be? And why?”

The deep-sea is our last frontier. The deep sea comprises the major habitable volume of Planet Earth. It holds a substantial repository of the biological diversity and geological resources on the planet. The 3D complexity, huge size and remoteness allied with the still relatively small effort on scientific research for the task involved means that it remains poorly understood.

Deep-sea environments provide us with a suite of goods and services that range from direct provisioning such as fish, chemical compounds for biotechnical industrial and pharmaceutical uses, or mineral resources, to less directly identifiable services such as regulation of the global biogeochemical cycles and nutrient cycling which are crucial to the functioning of our planetary system. As a result, there are a variety of emerging ecosystem goods and services including marine genetic resources, mining of minerals and gas hydrates and CO2 sequestration that are likely to require new governance approaches and careful environmental assessments to ensure that socio-economic gain is balanced with sustainable management.

Given the growing extension of industrial and economic activities into the deep sea, there is a strong need for a powerful vision based on an ecosystems approach coupled with the precautionary approach to support the goal of sustainable development and ocean health. Europe should position itself as a leader and front-runner in matching economic opportunities with best science and governance practices associated with the emerging exploitation of biological and mineral resources from the deep ocean, and other expected interventions like CO2 sequestration and deposition.